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2023 IGBO PRESIDNECY AND EL-RUFAI’S HALLUSINATIONS

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By Collins Ughalaa KSC
 
Nasir el-Rifai, Governor of Kaduna State, is considered one of the intelligent guys from the North. Eloquent? No doubt. But garrulous. Oftentimes he displays characteristics unbecoming of someone of his pedigree. He has the capacity to bless with one side of his mouth and curse with the other side of the mouth. Under him Kaduna State has become a slaughter house, a den of kidnappers and haven for all forms of banditry. Pundits say his divisive politics in Kaduna State fuels the crisis.

Former Economic Adviser to former Head of State, General Abdulsalami Abubakar, former Director of the Bureau for Public Enterprise (BPE), and former Minister for the Federal Capital Territory, El-Rufai should understand the problems that plague Nigeria better than many people. But that is not the case. His comments are erratic, inciting and indifferent. His big ego and unbridled appetite for power prevent him from seeing the larger picture. He wants to be Buhari’s successor if the All Progressives Congress (APC) retains its presidential ticket in the North; or Vice President, if the party zones its presidential ticket to the South. He appears not to care whether Nigeria burns, whether he would preside over a fragmented Nigeria, or not. 
 
On Thursday, May 6, Punch newspaper in its editorial entitled “Nigeria is sleepwalking into war” painted a graphic picture of the Nigerian conundrum. Citing recent killing of three of the kidnapped 23 undergraduates of Greenfield University in El-Rufai’s Kaduna State, the newspaper further quoted the Nobel Laureate, Prof Wole Soyinka, saying: “This nation is at war, yet we continue to pretend that these are mere birth-pangs of a glorious entity.” Punch noted that Boko Haram alone has killed over 100,000 persons and displaced others numbering millions. Besides, insurgents are taking over territories in the North once more. The editorial also quoted El-Rufai’s government in Kaduna State disclosing that 393 persons had lost their lives between January and March 2021; 926 kidnapped within the sane period.
 
Kaduna is not the only troubled State in the country. With reports of 741 Nigerians killed and over 1,000 kidnapped in the first 96 days in office of the new Service Chiefs, nothing else confirms that all parts of Nigeria are in one pang of distress or the other. The Southeast, for example, is currently witnessing insecurity. There have been attacks on security formations and other government owned institutions in recent time. On Monday, April 5, unknown gunmen attacked the Custodial Center in Owerri, the Police Command and military checkpoint at Ukwu Orji along Owerri-Onitsha Road. Few days later, the group launched a dare-devil attack on the house of the Governor in his village at Omuma, Oru East LGA. There have been similar attacks in other states of the Southeast. The Southwest is also going through its own pangs of distress. Ogun, Oyo, Ekiti, Ondo, and Osun States are currently being atrophied by insecurity. The police in Lagos State few days ago raised the alarm that groups plan to attack the State. The story is not different in the South-south.
 
The crisis bedeviling Nigeria has its roots in marginalization. This is pushing Nigeria to the precipice. Nigeria needs to be saved. Sadly, while patriotic Nigerians are shopping for solutions, Governor El-Rufai in whose Kaduna State 23 students were kidnapped in broad day light and three of them killed – while their kidnappers demanded N800M ransome, still has the motivation to lecture Ndigbo on how to go about their legitimate demand to produce the next president.

On Saturday, May 8, the media reported El-Rufai to say: “I don’t think anyone has stopped the Southeast from going for the presidency. But you see, you cannot get the Presidency of Nigeria by threats or by shouting victimhood. This is a political process and you have to engage other parts of Nigeria to convince them to support you. That is what everyone does. That is what Jonathan did in 2011; that is what Buhari did in 2015 and 2019. That is what every President does. You don’t stay in your corner, abuse everyone in Nigeria and say give me Presidency. It is not going to happen. Presidency is not by allocation. It is the result of a political process. You join a political party, your party negotiates with other parts of the country and it happens. That is how it is done. And you cannot get it by sitting down or threatening secession. It won’t work. I think the Southeast is going about it the wrong way because if you look at the APC for instance, we do not have many footprints in the Southeast.”
 
In the rave of the moment, El-Rufai conveniently forgot that no part of the country has all of its citizens in one political party. Not even his Kaduna State. In the face of this, it is erroneous that the APC does not have “many footprints in the Southeast”. Furthermore, it is shocking how El-Rufai stereotypes Ndigbo. His veiled reference to the IPOB and seeing Ndigbo in that light is condemnable. IPOB has been agitating for the Republic of Biafra. They cite years marginalisation as reason. But El-Rufai chose to see every Igbo man as members of the IPOB, as if everyone in the North is a member of Boko Haram or the bandits.

Igbo leaders have since made the point that they want a structured Nigeria where justice and equity reign. The President General of Ohaneze Ndigbo, Prof George Obiozor, for example, says that Ndigbo want fairness and equity, peace, progress and unity. Fairness and equity would bring us to see the need to support Ndigbo for the presidency. In a recent interview in Abuja, Prof Obiozor emphasized the “compellingly reasonable” need for the rest of Nigeria “to support the Southeast to produce the president of the Federal Republic of Nigeria the next time around”. He said that doing so would provide a sense of balance and sense of belonging, crucial in resolving the Nigeria dilemma.
 
In July 2017, Igbo leaders, including the five governors of the zone: Ifeanyi Ugwuanyi of Enugu, Okezie Ikpeazu of Abia, Rochas Okorocha of Imo, Willie Obiano of Anambra and Dave Umahi of Ebonyi; Senator Ike Ekweremadu, who was then the Deputy President of the Senate; and other members of the National Assembly, former Senate Presidents: Senators Adolphus Wabara and Ken Nnamani, then President General of Ohanaeze Ndigbo, Chief Nnia Nwodo, and his predecessor, Enwo Igariwey; former Chief of General Staff, Admiral Ebitu Ukiwe, former Inspector General of Police (IGP), Ogbonna Onovo, and a former Deputy Inspector General of Police, Hillary Opara, Deputy Governors, State Assembly Speakers, religious leaders and traditional rulers, rose from a closed-door meeting and restated the commitment of Ndigbo to a restructured, united Nigeria. The position of Igbo leaders on a restructured, united Nigeria was taken in the midst of intensified agitations for the creation of Biafra by IPOB and MASSOB. This is unlike the attitude of some leaders in the North towards the crisis in the area. Yet, El-Rufai does not see it.
 
Since his emergence as the Governor of Imo State and leader of the APC in Southeast, Governor Hope Uzodimma has maintained that Igbo people do not want to break away from the country, but to get justice and fair treatment in the country. “What Ndigbo want is justice, equity and fairness. A Nigeria that provides a level playing ground for all citizens. That is what we want. And we believe we can get what we want through constructive and tenacious engagement with fellow nationals and relevant institutions, not by violence or war”.

In spite of all this, El-Rufai chose to classify Ndigbo as people “shouting victimhood”, as if they are weak people. If El-Rufai does not listen to the leaders of Ndigbo, he is missing the point. No leader in Igbo land will listen to bandits in Kaduna who roam the streets, kidnap students and demand ransome, and misconstrue same to be the voice of the people of the State.
 
If Nigerian leaders refuse to listen to the leaders of the various ethnic groups, including their state governors, and prefer listening to non-state actors, we may not have a country where people like El-Rufai would become Governor and aspire to become president. El-Rufai should change style. Nigeria is not all about him. He should lend his voice to the call for restructured Nigeria in order to enthrone justice and fairness. This will guarantee a united Nigeria for all of us. It will remove marginalization which is the root of the agitation in parts of the country. Then people like El-Rufai will have the space to pursue their political ambitions in a better Nigeria.

Ignoring the call for restructuring Nigeria and talking down on Ndigbo because of their 2023 presidency project is not in the best interest of the country.

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GUEST COLUMNIST

Re: Open Letter to Ndigbo, by Hassan Gimba

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Last week’s write-up with the above title has generated so many responses that I feel today should be a day for the respondents. Please enjoy.

What can be more brotherly than feeling the pain of a brother and providing a way to relieve it? Malam Hassan, as we, your Potiskum people call you, you have shown them the way and the light. My hope now is that Ndigbos will find their trails and walk back again to the path of peace and harmony. After all, a word is enough for the wise.

Abdulrahman Muktar

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What a life-changing piece! … Certainly, a word is enough for the wise.

Yusuf Sardauna Dagare

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What a nice piece. A word, they say, is enough for a wise period!!!

Usman Dankani

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Excellent piece, why are they going on a suicide mission? Why should a shop owner want the market to be burned? Something is definitely wrong

Professor MK Othman

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Very Apt. May the good Lord divinely intervene in Jesus name, Amen.

Frank Garuk

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Profoundly Stated, Editor and Do Remain Blessed.

Ayanda Ngwane

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#Words I’ve been waiting for this, sir. May Allah increase you more in wisdom and understanding.

Ahmed Haruna Daya

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Excellent advice Dr A stitch in time saves 9.

Dr Yusuf Iliyasu

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Greater words were never written. May (the ink in) your pen never dry, Malam.

Abdurazaq Magaji

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I couldn’t forget how my two innocent brothers died at “Guantanamo” in Damaturu. My childhood friend too died there too. This Indomie generation doesn’t know war or history.

Bukar A. Musa

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Words of wisdom! Enough is enough.

We are proud of you.

Asma’u Abubakar Mahmud

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Words of wisdom, this is really enough for the wise.

Mohammed Garundole

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Jaundiced piece! Why can’t these almajris writers leave us alone? What i don’t understand is, must we be in the same country with you? Give us referendum and stop crying more that the bereaved.

Dennis K. Ezeh

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@Dennis K. Ezeh I guess you can’t read, or perhaps you have difficulty in comprehending words of wisdom. The type of kindness in this piece alone can attract the wrath of Amadioha of Ozuzu on you!

Yusuf Sardauna Dagare

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@Dennis K. Ezeh imagine, insulting a person who educationally has no mate in your entire family!

Barrah’u Haruna Nasir

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Boy does not know the fire until the fire burns him. Those people are being brainwashed by unscrupulous elements that is why they behave in a dogmatic way.

Ali Musa

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I don’t have time to read this nonsense, people who cannot pay house rent is it land they will buy.

Engr. Ozumba Jerry

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@Engr Ozumba Jerry thanks for reading it.

Ma’aruf Saminu

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@Engr. Ozumba Jerry it’s like you don’t know what you’re fighting for.

It is better for you to read before commenting nonsense, my friend.

Tijjani Idi Maikalanzir

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Well articulated.

Zanna Ali Haruna

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Dear Hassan Gimba, I appreciate your write up on the current situation in the south East. As a person, I don’t support violence in any form and am not here to justify that. I spent close to 14 years in Maiduguri from 2001 till 2014 and I was there when it all started. 

On the south East situation, let’s look at it from this direction based on your write up.

Originally IPOB agitation started with flags and other Biafran insignia and they were labelled “Terrorists”.

Presently no Igbo man is in the security apparatus/architecture of this country or does that mean NO IGBO MAN IS QUALIFIED TO BE THERE??.

In Igbo land, land business is huge business and requires capital but the question is HOW MANY NORTHERNERS ARE WILLING TO PAY?

On the issue of President from Igbo extraction, why are Northerners always afraid of that? Igbo’s are one of the major stakeholders in the Nigeria project.

On saying “IPOB terrorists” killed Ahmed Gulak, my brother time shall tell.

NIGERIA IS BLEEDING

Ozonweke IK Godwin Stage

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@Ozonweke Ik Godwin Stage Objection! When was IPOB labelled terrorist? Answer: When they armed themselves and started destructive actions.

No Igbo man in the security architecture? But it’s not by tribe or region even though you carved out Gen. Lucky Irabor who hail from Delta which is included in Biafra map, no problem.

How many Northerners are willing to pay for the land in the south? Am writing you this directly from the South. Bro, Northerners in the South are completely threatened even though we are financially fit to buy land. In fact in states like Port Harcourt, Bayelsa, excluding Abia and Imo, Hausa people prefer to reside there than the southeast, all because of atrocities committed in Igbo land and the inherent problems of your land dispute over years.

On the issue of the president: we never fear for an Igbo man to be president in this country if he can be truly voted into power.

IPOB killed Ahmed Gulak. Yes! No doubt. Commissioner of police confirmed and I choose that of the commissioner because he is responsible to brief the governor over this issue. Finally, Nigeria is safe since the country has identified its problems and taken the way out of these problems.

MD Faisal

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You have eloquently said it all, sir. A word is enough for the wise.

Musa Lamido

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I salute you, sir, for penning down this million-dollar piece. I think I should say that I would want to volunteer to be the bearer of this super epistle, or the emissary to bear it to the land of the Ndigbo. As you emphasised, we in the northeast have experienced it. So, your epistle is right on time. Let who has ears listen. Come what may, I remain a green-white-greener. Lastly, I sympathise with you, sir over the BH incident that haunted you back then. Allah ya kiyaye mu.

Adamkolo M. Ibrahim

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People with myopic mindset talking junk.

Nzubechukwu Umeojinaka Sampepe

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Nice open letter. More ink to your pen, sir and may almighty Allah exalts you in knowledge.

Auwal Jovial

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Oga you just they blow grammar. My issue with this northern janjaweed is why are they afraid to go their way?

Agu Ike Tony

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@Agu Ike Tony and who is holding you from going?

Talatu Hyat Baji

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May Allah guide and protect you, father.

Omar Ya’u Janda

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Wisdom ink on paper.

Jamil Sawwa Sawwa

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Fighting ourselves will do no one any good in this trying moment. Stronger we are to confront our contemporary challenges… I feel ashamed and disturbed when my brethren are strongly after the collapse of our dear nation. Remember, it takes years to build a nation, we have come a long way, went through the good, the bad and the ugly side of history. Are we going to restart afresh? Are we going to sacrifice all the labour of our heroes past of uniting this nation? Are we going to allow self-interest to overshadow public interest? Are we going to instil the fear of one another in the younger generation? 

Negotiation and roundtable discussion is the best avenue to frontally address the topical issues, not killings and threatening national peace, unity, integration and SECURITY. Whether you agree or disagree with me, WE ARE BROTHERS!

Umaru Yakubu Kirawa

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Well understood, can’t we forget our differences and live as one Nigeria, as said by the great Zik of Africa, or should we sort out our differences and live as one as said by the Sardauna? Am not in support of what Nnamdi Kanu is doing in the east, but the truth of the matter is once any act of criminality takes place in the east, without investigation, the security agencies know who is responsible, but when the herdsmen perpetrate their act in the south, the security agencies will keep mum.

Paul Parker

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Intimidating!

Nwabuisi Emmanuel-Onuigbo

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When somebody refuses to listen to the words of wisdom he must definitely cry for the words of violence. Fighting the problem with violence is just like adding petrol to fire. I do hope that they will listen to not only you but to many concerned citizens who are calling their attention to their acts of terrorism. 

God bless you, sir.

Baba Alhaji Mele

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A piece of good advice. Hope they listen.

Dr Suleiman Mohammed

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A soothing balm, indeed. The record is straight

Raymond Gukas

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Mr Gimba, you are such an amazing writer. To a large extent too, I think you are compassionate with your advice. I see a man who has shown concern at least to his brothers and sisters from the other side. Mr Ike Ozonweke has done well too to address part of the concerns in the east. What I see as a man from neither East nor North, is that there’s still a huge deposit of mistrust emanating from that unfortunate and unforgettable miscarriage some 51 years ago; the civil war. Until trust is bridged, no action of the president from the north will seem right or trusted by people from the other side, likewise when someone from the east steers the affairs of this great but haemorrhaging nation. The president does not seem to be doing enough in carrying everyone along; his silence on too many things going wrong, including his beloved Daura, is disheartening. If he really wants to correct the ills of the past, he should carry everyone along and people like Nnamdi Kanu cannot enjoy the sympathy of the gullible poor who are already fade up and are down already and need some form of reassurances. Let our president come out or better still go to the east as he did during campaigns and talk to the hungry and gullible citizens. The people are in fear and they choose to obey what you may wish to call distant voices because the real voice is silent or appears not to be there or concerned. I wish the people of the East can read your beautiful write-up and flee from the impending and imminent dangers. I don’t want to remember my experience at Galadima – Maiduguri. What is happening now is avoidable. Peace and justice are synonymous, and what is good for Ali, should be good for Emeka and Abiodun.

Emmanuel Clement

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Thank you, Dr Hassan. A timely admonition. I sincerely appreciate the article. This is a must-read for all south-easterners. I’ve already shared it on a few platforms.

Dr M. O. Ezechukwu

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Wow! To end a challenging day like Monday with an aptly written epistle is to end the day well. A word should be enough for the wise. Well done sir. God bless Nigeria.

Halima AbdulRa’uf

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Democracy of irony; the realities of Nigeria’s democracy Day celebrations

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The famous definition of democracy being the government of the people, by the people and for the people seems to be nonsense in the ears of Nigerians. Hold on a minute, someone said we are having a democracy. Is it in the newly formed online or audio country, United African Republic or in Nigeria?I will quickly detail some features of democracy and then together we can tick off the ones we have in Nigeria. Freedom of speech/press. This means barring slander, libel and character assassination, everyone in a democratic state has the right to say how he feels about the situation in his country. Can you say how you feel about government in Nigeria today and not be hushed? On democracy day, the people came out to say they are displeased with the government. A government that is celebrating democracy day sends out the police to harass the protesters by shooting tear gas and arresting them.Fear pervaded the entire atmosphere in Lagos, Abuja and other major cities. It is a funny irony that on Democracy Day, the people have their freedom and liberty truncated. Businesses are closed, transportation grounded and people stagnated all in the name of democracy day celebration. What an irony!Supremacy of the Constitution. The most abused document in contemporary times is the Nigerian constitution. The constitution guarantees the right to freedom of association, of speech, of movement etc. But the government today grossly disregards the constitution and its codes rights. Instead it’s own rules are seemingly superior to the constitution.
Right to life. In 1651, philosopher Thomas Hobbes wrote that the consent of the governed determines the legitimacy of the sovereign. That was the basis of the social contract theory. The people surrendered the right to be protected to a leviathan called the state. The state, therefore, wields the power over the people to punish the offender and to reward the law abiding citizens. According to Hobbes, without this leviathan life would be in the state of nature, that is nasty, brutish and short.The Nigerian state neither respects nor guarantees the right of the people to life. We have all become a conquered people. People live with their hearts in their mouths for fear of robbery, killer herdsmen, bandits and Boko Haram. Life in Nigeria has become like living in a state of nature where might is right.Travelling by air is less brutish than by road but it doesn’t make you safer than those who travel by road because you could still be hit by anything at the airport. Bandits are on a kidnapping spree, moving freely across the nation whole the president keeps mum or is concerned with other things.For instance, in his Arise TV interview, the only thing the president said about the #EndSARS protesters was that they were marching on Aso Rock presidential villa to remove him. Really? Power is the only thing that obviously matters to our political class on Nigeria. I shudder to think that the government watered down the #EndSARS protests to just an attempt to unseat the government.Even the police brutality, the savagery of the military and the rising costs of living due to the campaign of carnage embarked upon by bandits and the herdsmen weren’t seen as reasons enough for a protest by the president.Right to ownership of property. This is even worse. Boko Haram, bandits, herdsmen and other gangs of killers have unleashed unabated terror on the people of Nigeria and their properties,  yet the country’s authorities sit pretty, telling us that all is well. All is not well. We are running a war economy. Our currency has fallen. We are losing investors to neighbouring countries. We cannot  keep deluding ourselves that we are in the best of times. We cannot be disguising in the garb of democracy. Nigerians must say no to being silenced. We have a right to be defended by the government. We have a right to good life in our native country. That right is not a privilege granted by the government which deems all of us as its conquered serfs.God bless Nigeria. Alex Agbo is a researcher and a writer based in Lagos .

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US TRAINED EXPERT RECOMMENDS SOLUTION FOR INSECURITY IN NIGERIA

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Chief Iheanyi Chinasa Frank, a US-trained security expert and President, Red Hawk Security Solutions USA, has offered solutions that will help curb the increasing security challenges facing Nigeria and re-focus her on the path of progress through purposeful leadership that traverses beyond the boundaries of partisan politics.

According to him, “This is the time of truth. It is a period to thoroughly examine ourselves and tell ourselves the truth. Insecurity is ravaging our country. It is not that it has not been there before or that it would not be even in the best times, but the truth is that it has gone beyond tolerable levels.

“On one side you have the Boko Haram menace and on the other the ravaging herdsmen versus community residents. We also have armed robbery, banditry, kidnapping for ransom, and ritual killings. Indeed, these vices are realities of our present times. These problems would have been solved but because sometimes many of us want to deny reality, so they linger”, he said.

He noted that insecurity affects the growth and development of the country, adding “we also do ourselves so much harm when we refuse to accept the extent of insecurity that plagues the country.

Unfortunately, this was not the intention of the ruling party, they are trying their best but raw statistics keep showing that the country is losing more lives daily than nations at war. This situation is so revealing and so every well-meaning Nigerian and a lover of democracy should lend ideas and a voice.

“The truth from history is that every case of insecurity, no matter how complex it would seem, has an answer once there is a political will. How do we then solve our challenge of insecurity?; The first is to admit that the situation is bad and to have the federal government declare it a national emergency and involve more stakeholders and village chiefs in solving the problem. Politics is local and security is also local.
In this way, it becomes a national problem and not the challenge of the political party in power.

“For most times we have seen the challenge of insecurity as a failure of governance on the part of the ruling party. Other parties make fable references to developments in this regard, take frequent jabs at the ruling party, and retreat, feeling happy they have scored political points that could bolster their fortunes in the next general elections; this is not right.

“Challenge of insecurity, especially when it involves lives is beyond partisan politics. So declaring a national emergency would go a long way to change narratives and dispositions.
“So it is very pertinent that politicians meet and agree that it is time to drop negative behavior and bad political tactics so that the country can have peace. I insist that the politicians must look themselves in the face and agree, and once they agree, 70 percent of factors behind insecurity would be dealt with.

After that, the politicians and security experts can meet so they can hear each other. My only fear is that security experts tend to talk in billions of Naira and that can be scary. Not all security challenges require money to solve; a lot of them just require brain work and local collaborations.

“The third is to employ the power of public enlightenment. One can use the tool of public enlightenment to stop deviant behaviours in any area of jurisdiction. I have in recent times had things to do with youths from different parts of this country and one thing I discovered is that nobody speaks to their mind, not the parents, not the schools, and unfortunately the faith-based organisations also fail in this regard. They emphasise product over process and discipline, and that is taking its toll. Most leaders are not even thinking in that line.

“The absence of good policy and sound governance, combine to add to the problem. The vacuum created is being filled by foreign influences that are often far from realities. So we have a responsibility to teach why they should not bring harm to themselves and cause society so much pain. The National/State orientation agencies should build more peacebuilding content.

“The fourth action should come before education. There is an urgent need to draw a national development plan, perhaps a four-year plan which would require the three tiers of government (federal, state, and local) running developmental projects in key sectors of national life, all at the same time. Some of these projects could be mechanised agriculture with added value. Where they produce rice for instance there should be rice mills to turn them into finished products for the markets. There could also be small-scale industries that can turn rice into flour, same for beans, yam, palm oil, tomatoes, ginger, groundnut, and cashew nuts. I do not see why we cannot produce chocolates from cocoa. You can also talk about road infrastructure, massive housing, and petroleum refining capacity amongst others.

“It is still inconceivable that we cannot have uninterrupted electricity supply despite the huge funds that annually goes into the sector.

“Fifthly, credit facility has become an imperative. Many Nigerians know what to do but do not have funds. Imagine what would happen where the three tiers of governments are running credit facility programs. When our governments talk economy they talk only about fiscal and monetary policies; they hardly talk about the productive economy. It is time we begin to do so. We must look at the sectors and see how we could populate them with investors. Manufacturing is the livewire of any country. The youths we produce from our institutions must have avenues for self-actualisation.

“The sixth is education. Nearly 60 years after independence we are still producing educated people and not trained manpower. It is time we know that education without skill is a disservice of the highest order. There is a need to change our curriculum and restructure our institutions of learning, beginning even from primary schools. We must help educate and train our youths. I don’t want to talk about political restructuring even though I find so much sense in it. I also don’t want to talk about the police institution even though I know that the police’s main problem is not about numbers or remunerations.

Yes, they are part of it but the bigger problem is the institution itself. The way it is today, recruits would always be forced to bend to a police culture we know has not helped this country. Above all, we need good citizens that will believe in dialogue all the time and not war”.

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